An anti-vaccination campaign against COVID-19 vaccines

An anti-vaccination campaign against COVID-19 vaccines

As the vaccine continues to be launched, so does the vaccination campaign. To end the epidemic, health experts say a large portion of the population must be vaccinated. As the anti-vaccination campaigns continued, we asked Professor Bernice Houseman of Pennsylvania State University School of Medicine whether anti-vaccination campaigns are gaining momentum, could they affect the epidemiological response? “A lot of people feel anxious,” says Houseman. “I feel the anxiety is a bit misplaced.” She tells us it’s important to understand indecision. Myth 1: COVID-19 vaccines were developed very quickly, and it tells us: “(The most common myth) is that the vaccine was developed too quickly and there were not enough studies to prove its safety.” Houseman asserts that the efficacy has been proven. Currently, there are two types of COVID-19 vaccine available and many of them are in clinical trials. Each vaccine uses different types of technology, some newer and less common than others. “People may have different levels of comfort with different types of vaccines depending on how comfortable they are with the technology,” says Hausman. Myth # 2: The COVID-19 data is neither real nor improperly calculated. Calculated. She says health experts use data from national, county or city numbers and can understand why those numbers don’t always communicate with skeptical people. “People don’t test vaccines at the population level,” Houseman tells us. “Their bodies, the bodies of their children, or their family members.” As vaccines continue to be rolled out, Hausman says, more trust can be built. Until then, she says the focus should be on the distribution plan.

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As the vaccine continues to be launched, so does the vaccination campaign.

To end the epidemic, health experts say a large portion of the population must be vaccinated.

As the anti-vaccination campaigns continued, we asked Professor Bernice Houseman of Pennsylvania State University School of Medicine if anti-vaccination campaigns are gaining momentum, could they affect the epidemiological response?

“A lot of people feel anxious. I feel the anxiety is a bit misplaced,” says Dr. Houseman.

Hausman has done extensive research on the vaccination controversy. She tells us it’s important to understand indecision.

Myth 1: COVID-19 vaccines have been developed very quickly

It tells us, “(The most common myth) is that the vaccine was developed too quickly and there were not enough studies to prove its safety.” Houseman asserts that the efficacy has been proven.

Currently, there are two types of COVID-19 vaccine available and many of them are in clinical trials. Each vaccine uses different types of technology, some newer and less common than others.

“People may have different levels of comfort with different types of vaccines depending on how comfortable they are with the technology,” says Hausman.

Myth 2: The COVID-19 data is not real or incorrectly calculated

Another hesitation stems from concerns about how the COVID-19 data is calculated. She says health experts use data from national, county or city numbers and can understand why those numbers don’t always communicate with skeptical people.

“People don’t test vaccines at the population level,” Houseman tells us. “They test them on the level of their own bodies, the bodies of their children, or their family members.”

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As vaccines continue to be rolled out, Hausman says, more trust can be built. Until then, she says the focus should be on the distribution plan.

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